OUR PROPOSITION

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Our View of the game

The Underlying Principle

Netball is a sport with a unique structure. Alternating centre passes after each goal rather than possession going to the non-scoring team means both teams start the game with equal opportunity to score ahead of them – or equal ‘expected goals’. The game is in constant balance, but as it plays out some scoring opportunities will be realised while others will be lost, creating an imbalance in favour of one team.

The team that creates that most scoring opportunities (gaining ball) cannot lose.

Point 9 Analytics

We're netball-specific analysts.

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The Full Picture

How we see the game

Reporting

Why we report thing the way we do

Measures

What we actually measure

Video Analysis

How we use video analysis

Partnerships

Who we've partnered with

Education

How we can equip you with the tools and resources you need to develop

The Full Picture

In our definitions, possession for a team falls into one of two categories: 

  • a Centre Pass or
  • a Gain

A Centre Pass starts either at the beginning of a quarter or after a goal has been scored and finishes either with a goal being scored or a loss of possession. A ‘Gain’ is any gain in possession off the opposition, regardless of whose centre pass it is, and occurs during play. A ‘Gain’ can be made through a defensive rebound, an intercept or tip picked up or an error by the opposition. We consider that once a Centre Pass possession is lost, then that Centre Pass is determined as unsuccessful, regardless of whether possession is regained and scored by that team – in this instance the new possession would be counted as a Gain. A Gain can therefore be made off an opposition Centre Pass or off an opposition Gain, and there could be multiple Gains by both teams in the course of one goal being scored. When using this definition, we can then see that the number of Gains each team makes relative to the other becomes the determining factor in winning the game.

Given that both teams start with equal Centre Passes, the team that can make more Gains than the other team creates more scoring opportunities and

Note that we say ‘cannot lose’ rather than ‘will win’ – this is because there are instances where teams can be in possession at the end of the quarter but not have time to score. In these instances a scoring opportunity is lost, but there is no corresponding Gain for the opposition team. There is also the possibility that one team will have an extra Centre Pass due to the timing of the final whistle. These cases can result in one team having more Gains than the other but ending in a draw rather than a win, but note the team with more Gains cannot lose.

We do have a mathematical proof for this concept, but in simple terms, if a team can make more Gains than the opposition team, they cannot lose the game. It doesn’t matter how many gains they make as long as it’s more than the opposition, which brings the focus not only to ways to gain possession, but also ways to keep possession, or deny opposition gains. This way we view the game leads to an analysis framework built around understanding the effectiveness of a team’s ability to maximise gains while minimising losses. At an individual level we want to understand and measure the effectiveness of a player’s ability to carry out their positional role while contributing to this maximal gain/minimal loss target, also taking into account differing team structures and game plans.

Reporting

When we collect our data we end up with a huge amount of information on teams and individual players, but the way we report that data can have a significant effect on the interpretation of the performance of those teams and players.

1

Raw Counts v Proportions

How we we compare these numbers and why.

Raw Counts v Proportions

When considering individual players and how to measure their performance, the common method is to simply provide a raw count of relevant events for that player. For example, the number of feeds a player makes, or the number of Centre Passes received. While this is a valid method for some measures, in others – especially those relating to work rate variables – just providing the raw count doesn’t consider the team structure or the relative strengths and success of the teams involved in the game.

To use feeding as an example, two players on opposing teams may finish the game with the same number of successful feeds made. Using just the raw count to evaluate this area of performance would suggest they performed at a similar level. However if we consider the total number of successful feeds by each team, we may find that Team A had significantly more possession and were able to feed the ball into their shooters much more often than Team B. In this situation if we look at the individual player counts as proportions of the team totals, the player on Team A would actually have carried out a much lower feeding workload within their team than the player in Team B.

For this reason, we report several of our individual player measures as proportion of team totals, to give a indication of a player's contribution to their team's performance.

2

Raw Counts v Success Rates

How we we compare these numbers and why.

Raw Counts v Proportions

When considering individual players and how to measure their performance, the common method  to simply provide a raw count of relevant events for that player. For example, the number of feeds a player makes, or the number of Centre Passes received. While this is a valid method for some measures, in others – especially those relating to work rate variables – just providing the raw count doesn’t consider the team structure or the relative strengths and success of the teams involved in the game.

To use feeding as an example, two players on opposing teams may finish the game with the same number of successful feeds made. Using just the raw count to evaluate this area of performance would suggest they performed at a similar level. However if we consider the total number of successful feeds by each team, we may find that Team A had significantly more possession and were able to feed the ball into their shooters much more often than Team B. In this situation if we look at the individual player counts as proportions of the team totals, the player on Team A would actually have carried out a much lower feeding workload within their team than the player in Team B.

3

Making Comparisons

How we we compare these numbers and why.

Making Comparisons

There are two issues with making straight comparisons between individual players – they may be playing different positions, and they may have had differing amounts of court time. Netball is a structured game – not only do different positions have different roles, they are also limited by where they can go on the court and where the ball can go. Unlike most other team sports where although there are positional roles, any position can perform most actions (scoring, rebounding, defending etc), in netball playing positions strictly define what a player can and can’t do. A GK cannot feed, a GS cannot receive the Centre Pass, a WA cannot shoot, the list goes on. 

As a result, instead of throwing all player measures into the same data table, we report our data by position, so accurate comparisons can be made. If a player has played more than one position, they will have separate sets of measures for each position, to reflect the different roles they would be expected to fulfil on the court. To deal with the issue of differing court time, we adjust all our measures to make sure they are given on the same scale.

Proportions and accuracy percentages are all fine to be compared as they have no unit, but all straight counts (e.g. penalties, gains, tips etc) are adjusted to be on a per-quarter basis, so that we can accurately compare Player A who has played 20 quarters over the season with Player B who has had twice as much time on the court.

By doing this we are giving a comparison of a player’s effectiveness rather than giving weight to player results simply because they have had more opportunity.

We also have a system to extrapolate out results for players who have only played partial quarters, or who have changed positions during a quarter (as our results are separated by position), however we do advise caution when considering this partial data, or data for players with very limited court time.

The Measures

Here we give a breakdown of all the statistical measures we look at, both at a team level and at an individual level.

For individuals we have separated the list of measures into positions. Note that there are some generic measures relevant to all and some position-specific variables. All of these measures, with the exception of the Pace factors, can be collected and tracked live in game.

Other Statistical Information

As well as the statistical measures outlined in the previous section, we can also produce information and visuals in the following areas:

We measure the performance of the teams in ‘Critical Moment’ plays. These are pre-determined periods in the game that fall into one of three categories – Centre Pass Attack or Defence after a Break, Last 90 seconds of each quarter, Next 4 goals scored after a mid-quarter substitution has been made. Can be tracked live in game.

We can produce a visual representation of momentum changes throughout each quarter. Momentum is calculated based on accumulation of points for scoring possession and ease of passage through court, and loss of points for opposition equivalents. Overlaid on the momentum graphs are instances of scoring, and indications of substitutions and Last 90 seconds. Generated live in game.

We can give an indication of the most common combinations when looking at passing between players, feeding into shooters and 1st/2nd Phase Centre Pass receives. Generated live in game.

We can produce a breakdown of what is called and where. Generally produced post-game, but with a second person can be tracked live in game.

We can give a heatmap visualisation of the court for Centre Pass receives (1st/2nd/3rd phase) and feeding. With a second person can be tracked live in game.

We can produce a heatmap visualisation for shooting at both a team and individual level. There are charts for both accuracy and volume, and with those charts comes extra information around Penalty Shot accuracy and willingness to shoot as opposed to passing back out or offloading. Generally produced post-game, but with a second person could be tracked live in game.

Video Analysis

Control

Review game activity frame-by-frame or task-by-task

Analyze

Analyze playing patterns and trends, for you and your opposition

Focus

Focus on particular areas of the game

Add

Compliments statistics and verbal feedback

Learning

Caters to different learning styles

Play Video

• Our video analysis platform is a web-based service, which means that players and management can access the analysis from anywhere in the world, on any device, at any time.

• Integrated social media aspects, so players and coaches can interact with each other and moments of the game

• Clips can be customised to an audience – be it player, playing unit or the team as a whole

In conjunction with this, we can capture game footage and code on a single device (iPad). During peak-times and high-demand, you can have coded footage in your hand before you leave the court – there’s no waiting for conversions or upload, there are no delays.

Partnerships

Our video coding partner.

We’ve chosen Nacsport for their strong reputation, their excellent customer service, their product versatility and their drive for innovation. Nacsport doesn’t rest on the laurels of their current offerings – they listen and work with us to ensure we’re getting all that we need from their product range.

Our video analysis partner.

Coach Logic understand the needs of a high performance team and offer a truly integrated video analysis tool for management and players alike. It’s ease of use and compatibility make it a no-brainer and we’re sure you’ll agree too.

Our mobile analysis partner.

A genuinely innovative product, our friends at Nacsport have developed a mobile coding application that concurrently records the game. This is our chosen method of game capture because there’s no delay. Our coach has coded footage on a device before he/she leaves the court.

Education

Much of our proposition has been about us being there and/or doing the analysis for you.

But we also want to ensure you can continue to track measures and analyse performances without us. We can set you up so you can continue to use video analysis and with some truncated stats collection methods. We can provide some sessions around game measurement, team strategy and opposition analysis. All of this is designed to promote accountability and drive improvement.

That's all for now!

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